Resources for Individuals and Families

Resources for Individuals and Families

 

Self Care Resources and Apps

Families and the Coronavirus
Helpful information from UCSF Department of Psychiatry on how to talk with children about COVID-19 and developmentally appropriate ideas for how to keep them feeling good during these unpredictable times.

The Science of Wellbeing: A Coursera course offered by Yale
In this course you will engage in a series of challenges designed to increase your own happiness and build more productive habits.

Useful Wellness and Mental Health Apps
Apps help lead us and remind us to practice self-care every day. The apps at this link have been shown to be effective in evidence-based research.

Pandemic Care Resources from Tara Brach

Calm (a Meditation and Mindfulness App)
All content on this link is free

Headspace – New York State of Mind
All content housed at this link is free from this meditation app

Headspace – Weather the Storm Collection
All content housed at this link is free from this meditation app


Free Fitness Opportunities

Trauma Sensitive Yoga
These online classes are the Trauma Sensitive Yoga Center’s community response to this unprecedented global experience that we are all engaged in right now with the impact of the coronavirus.

Planet Fitness Free Daily Home Work-Ins

Virtual Workouts Provided by the YMCA

Orange Theory at Home
You won’t need special equipment, although we may ask you to scrounge around the house for some objects.

Core Power Yoga

125+ Free Streaming Workouts to Do From Home During Coronavirus (collaborated by Parade.com)


Resources and Activities for Families

Wide Open School
Wide Open School is a free collection of the best online learning experiences for kids curated by the editors at Common Sense.

ABC Mouse

Learn in Color

PBS Learning Media

Scholastic Learn at Home

56 World-Famous Sites From Your Couch For Free

Explore.Org Live Animal Cams

Take your Kids to Disney — Virtually!

Netflix Parties

WE'RE HERE TO HELP

Nearly 1 in 5 adults, more than 18%, in the U.S. experience mental illness in a given year.

5-6% of American adults have a serious mental illness; about 2% have disorders that are long-term and disabling, contributing to very high rates of unemployment and poor living conditions.

More than 450 million people around the world live with mental illnesses.

20-25% of Americans have a diagnosable mental and/or substance use disorder in any given year: 6.8 million people with an addiction have a mental illness.

There were approximately 20.6 million people in the United States over the age of 12 with an addiction in 2011, excluding tobacco.

Over 3 million people in 2011 received treatment for their addiction.

The Long Island Coalition estimated that there are approximately 3,000 homeless people in Nassau County and 64 of them are living on the streets.

30-40% of homeless adults and 15-20% of people in jails and prisons in the United States have a serious mental illness. This is often accompanied by substance abuse problems in both these populations.

As many as 10% of children have a serious emotional disturbance, contributing to school failure and other serious problems.

Just over 20 percent of children, either currently or at some point during their life, have had a seriously debilitating mental disorder.

It is estimated that 1 in 68 children in the US have autism.

As the number of older adults doubles over the next two decades so will the number of older adults with mental disordersThis includes 5.5 million older adults who currently have Alzheimer’s disorder or other dementia. Without advances in prevention, this will rise to 11 million older adults with dementia by 2050.

11 to 20% of veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars (Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom) have been diagnosed with PTSD.

30% of soldiers develop mental problems within 3 to 4 months of being home.

Depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (aka PTSD, an anxiety disorder that follows experiencing a traumatic event) are the most common mental health problems faced by returning troops.